SUMMARY | DAY 1 | DAY 2 | DAY 3 | DAY 4

Summary

SUNDAY 2 OCTOBER
16.00-18.00 WELCOME RECEPTION
Rodehoed, Keizergracht 102, Amsterdam (see www.rodehoed.nl for map)

19.00-21.00  EXCURSIONS (site visits)

MONDAY 3 OCTOBER
DAILY THEMES: Mental health, Crises and catastrophes, Leadership
09.00-09.15 Welcome to LEPH2016
09.15-10.30 PLENARY 1: Mental Health and leadership
10.30-11.00 LEPH ORATION
Crossing at the Intersection: Criminal Justice, Public Health and Political Peril
11.30-13.00 MAJOR SESSIONS
M1 Educating police officers by experience experts in psychiatry and addiction
M2 MH17 plane disaster: support for the relatives of victims
M3 When policing is the public health crisis
13.00-17.30 POSTERS
13.15-13.45 S1: SPECIAL LUNCHTIME LECTURE
It’s a rotten job but someone has to do it: why the public health community must tackle organised crime
14.00-15.30 CONCURRENT SESSIONS (C) and MARKETPLACE OF IDEAS (MoI)
C1 Much more than just training! Collaborations to improve police response to persons with mental health/behavioural disorders
C2 Converging criminalization: the human rights impact of law enforcement and health care providers joint efforts to punish women
C3 Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion: a harm reduction and public health approach to drug enforcement
C4 Harm reduction and international drug policing
MoI 1 “Together we are Utrecht”: the importance of an integrated approach to radicalisation and polarisation in the local context
MoI 2 Falsified medicines, organized crime and legal responses
MoI 3 A reflection on the ‘Disclosure Scheme for Domestic Abuse’ Scotland
MoI 4 Crime seen? Inadvertent entry into the criminal justice system as a result of a behaviour associated with epileptic seizure activity
16.00-17.30 CONCURRENT SESSIONS (C) and MARKETPLACE OF IDEAS (MoI)
C5 Mental health: Training police and evaluating interventions
C6 Shifting paradigms in approaches to radicalisation
C7 Leadership & partnership
C8 Police as partners in promoting access to abortion in Ghana, Nigeria and Zambia
MoI 5 Getting to LEAD: support for jurisdictions interested in replicating Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion
MoI 6 Collaborative Outcomes Learning Tool for Prevent – a multi-agency approach to understanding and responding to extremism in Scotland
MoI 7 LEPH2016 Film – Film festival
MoI 8 Law enforcement-mental health collaborations to respond to children and families exposed to violence: the Child Development and Community Policing Program (CDCP)
16.00-17.30 S2: SPECIAL SKILLS TRAINING SESSION
Better policy mapping through science
19.00-21.00 EXCURSIONS (site visits)
TUESDAY 4 OCTOBER
DAILY THEMES: Alcohol, Vulnerability, Leadership
09.00-17.30 POSTERS
09.00-10.30 PLENARY 2: Alcohol, Vulnerability & Leadership
11.00-12.30 MAJOR SESSIONS
M4 Leadership on the intersections of law enforcement and public health
M5 Optimising police-academic collaborative research on public health and protection: A Scottish Model
M6 ENALE 1: European Network on Alcohol Law Enforcement special session.
Combating drunkenness and over-serving
12.45-13.15 S3: SPECIAL LUNCHTIME LECTURE
Policing vulnerable people – towards a framework for analysis
13.30-15.00 CONCURRENT SESSIONS (C) and MARKETPLACE OF IDEAS (MoI)
C9 Refugees and LEPH – what’s the relevance?
C10 Vulnerability
C11 The practice of law enforcement and public health in Amsterdam neighbourhoods
C12 The role of prisons in public health
ENALE 2: European Network on Alcohol Law Enforcement special session
Alcohol law enforcement: the Dutch way
MoI 9 Implementing the Police, Ambulance and Clinical Early Response (PACER) team in Geelong: a regional example of police-mental health partnership
MoI 10 How can the introduction of new evaluation criteria of operational police performance help protect the rights of vulnerable communities?
MoI 11 Game of Life: balancing health and safety
MoI 12 Safe environments within police services: no safety outside without safety ‘inside’
15.30-17.00 CONCURRENT SESSIONS (C) and MARKETPLACE OF IDEAS (MoI)
C13 Social disruption – the (mini) crisis approach: the connection between public health and safety
C14 Illicit drugs
C15 Amsterdam vice case: inter-agency response to a major child abuse case     
C16 Prisons
ENALE 3: European Network on Alcohol Law Enforcement special session
Police and night-time economies
MoI 13 Collaboration in threat management between police and mental health care workers
MoI 14 Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion (LEAD): changing police practices
MoI 15 Tackling the harm of binge drinking – a Police Scotland, Community Partnership and Robert Gordon University student approach
MoI 16 Law enforcement and harm reduction: informing, advancing, assisting
17.00-18.00 NETWORKING SESSION
Refreshments for all LEPH2016 participants (at conference venue)
WEDNESDAY 5 OCTOBER
DAILY THEMES: Infectious diseases, Harm Reduction, Trauma
09.00-10.30 PLENARY 3: Harm reduction and trauma
11.00-12.30 MAJOR SESSIONS
M7 The phenomenon of trauma: challenges and rewards of law enforcement – mental health partnerships
M8 HIV and harm reduction
M9 Developing effective police responses to reduce the public health burden of intimate partner and family violence
12.45-13.15 S4: SPECIAL LUNCHTIME LECTURE
Police dealing with mental health issues in low income settings
13.30-15.00 CONCURRENT SESSIONS (C) and MARKETPLACE OF IDEAS (MoI)
C17 Harm reduction and police 1: Problems and Challenges
C18 Violence
C19 Drug consumption rooms as a win-win tool for public order and for the health of people who use drugs
C20 The Amsterdam approach on extreme intimidation and harassment in the home environment
MoI 17 Trauma-focused police responses to children exposed to violence: a national plan for the United States
MoI 18 Family group conference
MoI 19 Cooperation works! Sexual Assault Center Amsterdam-Amstelland: accessible and essential care for all recent victims of sexual assault
MoI 20 Think Tank: How do we best achieve a joined-up police and mental health response to mental health crisis?
15.30-17.00 CONCURRENT SESSIONS (C) and MARKETPLACE OF IDEAS (MoI)
C21 Drug courts: are they a solution or a problem?
C22 Mental health 2: Law enforcement and mental health in practice
C23 Harm reduction and police 2: Approaches to solutions
C24 Trauma
17.00-17.30 PLENARY 4: LEPH2016 CONFERENCE CLOSING SESSION

Day 1: Sunday 2 October

16.00-18.00 WELCOME RECEPTION
Rodehoed, Keizergracht 102, Amsterdam (see www.rodehoed.nl )

Day 2: Monday 3 October

DAILY THEMES: Mental health, Crises and catastrophes, Leadership
09.00-09.15 Welcome to LEPH2016
09.15-10.30

PLENARY 1: Mental Health, Leadership


LOCATION:
Red Hall

CHAIR: Warwick Jones, Executive Director, Australian Institute of Police Management

10.30-11.00 LEPH ORATION
LOCATION:
Red HallCHAIR: Warwick Jones, Executive Director, Australian Institute of Police Management
  ORATOR: Allan Rock
President, University of Ottawa
Crossing at the intersection: criminal justice, public health and political peril
11.00-11.30 Morning tea
11.30-13.00 MAJOR SESSIONS
M1 M2 M3
Educating police officers by experience experts in psychiatry and addiction MH17 plane disaster: support for the relatives of victims When policing is the public health crisis
LOCATION: Blue Hall
LOCATION: Red Hall
LOCATION: Room 6/7
CHAIR: Joris van t’Hoff
Dutch Police Service

SUMMARY:
When police and experience experts – experts because of their lived experience – come together, and share experiences and see the vulnerabilities and strengths of the other, this creates understanding from both sides, and police officers learn how
to deal better with persons who suffer from mental illness, so that on both sides better results are achieved. Inge Boele is an experience expert who gives this training to Dutch police officers tells you about her work and how she uses her own story of psychotic episodes to educate police officers, both at the academy as well as in the work field. It is hoped that a Dutch police officer who has followed her training will explain how it helped them to handle psychiatric and addiction problems in their work. Together they will help you to get an understanding of the value of using experience experts in training police officers in crisis situations around mental health care. This will be complemented by the perspective of a UK police officer addressing similar issues
CHAIR: Maurice Punch
Visiting Professor, London School of Economics and Politics, England

SUMMARY:
There were 196 Dutch citizens on board with a total of 298 fatalities from 10 countries when MH17 was hit in July 2014 by a missile launched as part of a conflict within the Ukraine, with possible Russian involvement: this was in no-one’s worst-case scenario – a civilian airliner in approved air-space. Police officers, members of the Marechaussee (KMA), diverse government officials and welfare agencies had to respond instantly – including the specialist police Disaster Identification Team / LFTO. This was a daunting task with multiple facets that involved many agencies over a long period of time and that also has a strong values element in dealing with the victims and their families and friends with dignity, compassion but also through mundane, practical support.

CHAIR: Jasmine Tyler, Open Society Foundations, USA

SUMMARY:

Police abuses are increasingly recognized as systemic failures that actually undermine public order leading some public health experts to cite this violence as a public health crisis. The physical and mental strain and harm that individuals and communities experience – and the stress and blowback faced by law enforcement – challenge public health practitioners to respond. This panel will examine the practices and policies that contribute to this harm, including how health practitioners, community advocates, and law enforcement can work together to respond effectively.
PRESENTERS:

  1. Inge Boele,
    Ingetikt, The Netherlands
  2. Arnhem Police Officer (TBC)
  3. Paul Jennings,
    Hampshire Constabulary, England
    Integrated police and mental health mentoring teams for ‘high intensity’ patients
PRESENTERS and PANELLISTS:

  1. Victor Jammers,
    Member of Governing Board, Victim Support Netherlands / Slachtofferhulp Nederland
    The diverse means of supporting relatives of victims in an exceptional case, the MH17 crash
  2. Lute Nieuwerth,
    Dutch Police Service, East Netherlands
    The role and function of ‘family detectives’ following a calamity
 PRESENTERS and PANELLISTS:

  1. Neill Franklin,
    Executive Director, Law Enforcement Against Prohibition, USA
    Policing: a public health solution
  2. Kassandra Frederique,
    NY State Drug Policy Alliance, USA
    Reducing the role of law enforcement: a public health imperative 
  3. Hannah Cooper,
    Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, USA
    Social and policy drivers of excessive police violence against Black adults and adolescents in the U.S.
  4. Jurema Werneck,
    member of Criola, (a Black women’s NGO), Brazil
    Look at it through Black women’s eyes
  5. Anneke Osse,
    International Consultant, Police and Human Rights, Nairobi, Kenya
    Police killings in Kenya from a public health perspective

 

13.00-17.30 POSTERS
  1. Prevention of non-communicable diseases in Argentinean Federal Police
    Juan Cruz Escardo, Ministry of National Security, Argentina
  2. HIV prevention policy and promotion of sexual and reproductive health for security forces officers in Argentina
    Juan Cruz Escardo,
    Ministry of National Security, Argentina
  3. Violent offenders as a target population for public health mental health care
    Thijs Fassaert,
    Public Health Service, Amsterdam
  4. A partnership approach to providing on-site HIV services for probationers and parolees: a pilot study from Alabama, USA
    Bronwen Lichtenstein, University of Alabama, USA
  5. No health without justice, no justice without health: building local health and justice partnerships
    Sunita Sturup-Toft,
    Public Health England
  6. Police referral to community services in Queensland, Australia
    Liz Greenbank, Infoxchange, Australia
  7. Southern Metropolitan Alcohol Diversion Pilot Program
    Annie Trainor, Australian Community Service Organisation
  8. Hospital referrals of detainees during police custody in Amsterdam, The Netherlands
    Tina Dorn, Public Health Service Amsterdam
13.00-14.00 Lunch
13.15-13.45 S1: SPECIAL LUNCHTIME LECTURE:

LOCATION: Blue Hall

 GLEPH RN logo CHAIR: Steve James, School of Social and Political Sciences, University of Melbourne, Australia

PRESENTER: Professor Martin McKee, President, European Public Health Association (EUPHA)

It’s a rotten job but someone has to do it: why the public health community must tackle organised crime

14.00-15.30 CONCURRENT SESSIONS (C) and MARKETPLACE OF IDEAS (MoI)
C1 C2 C3 C4
Much more than just training! Collaborations to improve police response to persons with mental health/behavioural disorders Converging criminalization: the human rights impact of law enforcement and health care providers joint efforts to punish women Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion: a harm reduction and public health approach to drug enforcement Harm reduction and international drug policing
LOCATION: Red Hall
LOCATION: Room 6/7
LOCATION: Blue Hall
LOCATION: Room 8/9
CHAIR: Amy Watson
University of Illinois in Chicago, USA 
CHAIR: Carolyn Eisert, CHAIR: Marc Krupanski,
Open Society Foundations, USA
CHAIR: Jarrett Blaustein,
Monash University, Australia
PRESENTERS:

  1. Amy C Watson,
    University of Illinois in Chicago, USA
    Jennifer Wood,
    Temple University, USA
    CIT and the Next Wave: Enhanced Collaborations and Multi- layered models
  2. Mike Weaver,
    National Alliance on Mental Illness, USA;
    Sarah M Greene,
    Mecklenburg County Trauma and Justice Partnerships, USA;
    Eddie Levins,
    Mecklenburg Police Department (ret), USA
    A Trauma-informed, Recovery Focused Mental Health-Police Partnership in a Mid-size Metropolitan Community
  3. Jennie Simpson,
    Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), USA
    Leading through policy innovation: the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Agency’s (SAMHSA) leadership efforts to address behavioural health and law enforcement collaboration
  4. Michael Compton, Lenox Hill Hospital, USA,
    Leveraging electronic notifications and telephonic support to connect local law enforcement to local mental health services
PRESENTERS:

  1. Amnesty International – introduction/moderation
  2. Mikhail Golichenko,
    Canadian HIV/AIDS Legal Network, Toronto, Canada
    Human rights implication of denial of health care to pregnant women who use drugs
  3. Farah Diaz-Tello,
    National Advocates for Pregnant Women, New York, USA
    Role of health care providers in reporting to police/court mandated drug treatment
  4. Gonzalo Leiva Rojas,
    Santiago, Chile
    Mid-wife, birthing rights advocate: obstetric violence, mandated reporting, etc.
  5. Leigh Maddox,
    LEAP, Baltimore, Maryland Drug control policies
This session will be a facilitated discussion.

DISCUSSANTS:

  1. Chief Brendan Cox,
    Albany Police Department, USA
  2. Alice Green,
    Center for Law and Justice, USA
  3. Keith Brown,
    Katal Center for Health, Equity and Justice, USA
  4. Jim Pugel,
    King County Sherriff’s Office, Seattle, USA
  5. Deanna Nollette,
    Seattle Police Department, USA
  6. Lisa Daugaard,
    Public Defender Association, USA
PRESENTERS:

  1. Melissa Jardine,
    University of New South Wales & Centre for Law Enforcement and Public Health, Australia
    Weighing up disruption and congruity in drug law enforcement strategies
  2. Leo Beletsky,
    Northeastern University, USA
    Harm reduction, policy reform, and policing practice: the case of Narcomenudeo implementation in Tijuana, Mexico
  3. Jarrett Blaustein,
    Monash University, Australia
    Reimagining harm reduction for transnational policing
  4. Lisa Sugiura,
    University of Portsmouth, England,
    Responding to the illegal procurement of pharmaceuticals online
14.00-15.30 CONCURRENT SESSIONS (C) and MARKETPLACE OF IDEAS (MoI)
MoI 1 MoI 2 MoI 3 MoI 4
“Together we are Utrecht”: the importance of an integrated approach to radicalisation and polarisation in the local context Falsified medicines, organized crime and legal responses A reflection on the ‘Disclosure Scheme for Domestic Abuse’ Scotland (Maximum 20 participants)
Crime seen? Inadvertent entry into the criminal justice system as a result of a behaviour associated with epileptic seizure activity
LOCATION: White room
LOCATION: Black room
LOCATION: Room 5
LOCATION: Room 2
SUMMARY: SUMMARY:
Falsified and substandard medicines are a known public health problem and may cause drug resistance, treatment failure and death. In some low and middle income countries, up to and more than 15% of all drugs sold may be falsified or substandard. Falsified medicines are manufactured and sold by criminal individuals and organizations, exploiting weak national legislation and enforcement, and an unsuspecting and uninformed public.This session will address the growing global criminal trade in falsified medicines. Speakers will address both challenges in OECD and other regions. Discussion will focus on the collaboration and resources needed to strengthen legal frameworks and enforcement to address this deadly, 21st century public health threat.
SUMMARY:
Scotland’s major method to prevent domestic abuse through policing and inter-agency collaboration has come from the introduction of the Disclosure Scheme for Domestic Abuse, often known as ‘Clare’s Law’ (in remembrance of Clare Wood, murdered by her violent ex- partner in 2009). This session will provide an idea of the disclosure process and a reflection on positives and negatives from a local area perspective and will also discuss the partnership developed between Police Scotland and Women’s Aid in Scotland. Feedback from police officers on their own thoughts about dealing with domestic violence will be sought, and if other parts of Europe are considering Clare’s Law.
SUMMARY:
A general introduction to the condition of epilepsy with short video clips of seizure activity and behaviour that may be misinterpreted, illustrated with case studies; a section on learning disabilities (LD) and the impact on the individual and those (e.g. the police) who may be in first contact with the individual; and then exercises to demonstrate LD. A list of questions the police should ask, looking beyond what they have seen or what has been reported to them, and finishing with a clip for the audience to decide if the person is experiencing a seizure or not.
CO-HOSTS:
International Development Law Organization (IDLO) & the United Nations Interregional Crime and Justice Research Institute (UNICRI)

MODERATOR:
David Patterson,
International Development Law Organization, The Netherlands

PRESENTER and FACILITATOR:
Janine Ewen,
Grampian Women’s Aid, Aberdeen, Scotland
PRESENTER and FACILITATOR:
Lesslie Young, Epilepsy Scotland
FACILITATORS:

  1. Joke Brouwer,
    Head of Social Development, City of Utrecht, The Netherlands
  2. Ad Sanders,
    Deputy District Chief of Police, City of Utrecht, The Netherlands
PRESENTERS:

  1. Marco Musumeci,
    Programme Coordinator, UNICRI
    Organized crime and falsified medicines
  2. Simeon Wilson,
    Senior Director, Global Security, AstraZeneca,
    Scope of the problem, emerging areas of criminal activity
  3. David Patterson,
    Senior Legal Expert, Health, IDLO,
    Pilot study in Uganda – challenges in non-OECD countries
 Crime seen? Inadvertent entry into the criminal justice system as a result of a behaviour associated with epileptic seizure activity
15.30-16.00 Afternoon tea
16.00-17.30 CONCURRENT SESSIONS (C) and MARKETPLACE OF IDEAS (MoI)
C5 C6 C7 C8
Mental health: Training police and evaluating interventions (Proffered papers) Shifting paradigms in approaches to radicalisation Leadership and partnership (Proffered papers) Police as partners in promoting access to abortion in Ghana, Nigeria and Zambia
LOCATION: Red Hall
LOCATION: Blue Hall
LOCATION: Room 6/7
LOCATION: Room 8/9
CHAIR:
Gerben Meynen,

VU University, Amsterdam
CHAIR: Thijs Fassaert,
Public Health Service, Amsterdam
CHAIR: Roberta Julian,
Tasmanian Institute of Law Enforcement Studies, Australia
FACILITATOR: Patty Skuster,
Ipas, USA
Toolkit Presentation
PRESENTERS:

  1. Nicolette Zingerle,
    Royal Melbourne Hospital, Australia
    Law enforcement and mental health programs – initiatives at the interface: a review of the literature
  2. Lore Mergaerts,
    KU Leuven, Belgium
    Identifying and recognizing mentally vulnerable suspects in a criminal investigation: a difficult task for the police
  3. Peter Silverstone & Yasmeen Krameddine,
    University of Alberta, Canada
    Evidence-based online mental health interaction and de-escalati0n training for police officers: preview
    and preliminary results
  4. Jennifer Lavoie,
    Wilfred Laurier University, Canada
    Policing responses to Canadians living with mental illness: an ethnographic case study of the launch of a standardized EDP
  5. Stuart Thomas,
    RMIT University, Australia
    Mental health training for police: what should the focus be?
  6. Helen Wells,
    Keele University, England
    When persuasion fails: the use and implications of direct and indirect sanctions for ‘bad’ health choices within healthcare
  7. Samantha Weston,
    Keele University, England
    Police approaches and management of situations involving persons with mental ill health
PRESENTERS:

  1. Hans Moors,
    E.M.M.A. (Experts in Media and Social Issues), The Netherlands
    Why do people kill in Allah’s name? How to develop rock-solid prevention/ disengagement/ desistance strategies – towards a theoretical framework
  2. Anton Weenink,
    Dutch Police Service, The Netherlands
    Before radicalisation: follow-up study on behavioural problems and disorders in radicals in police files
  3. Holly Young,
    Arq/Impact, The Netherlands
    Terra toolkit for police (European network-based prevention and learning program)
  4. Lisa de Haan,
    City of Amsterdam, The Netherlands
    Amsterdam’s approach to counter radicalisation, polarization and violent extremism
  5. Christel Grimbergen,
    Public Health Service, Amsterdam
    A practical public health perspective from the Amsterdam approach to radicalisation
PRESENTERS:

  1. Anil Anand,
    Mississauga, Canada
    Mending broken fences policing: developing the intelligence-led/ community-based policing model and Quality/ Quantity/ Crime (QQC) Model
  2. Jan Fox,
    REACH Edmonton, Canada
    REACH Edmonton – an innovative approach to building partnerships to address complex social issues by investing in collaboration
  3. Christian Schneider,
    Federal Office of Police, Switzerland
    Using scenario techniques to explore resilience in police- public health relationships
  4. Daliah Heller,
    City University of New York, USA
    US healthcare reform is a vehicle for US criminal justice reform: identifying and capturing the opportunities for change
  5. Roberta Julian,
    Tasmanian Institute of Law Enforcement Studies, Australia
    Exploring law enforcement and public health (LEPH) as a collective impact initiative
PANELLISTS:

  1. Julius Yankson, Superintendent, Ghana Police Service
  2. Kennedy Mumbi,
    Zambia Police Presentation
  3. Adejobi Olumuyiwa,
    Nigeria Police Force
16.00-17.30 CONCURRENT SESSIONS (C) and MARKETPLACE OF IDEAS (MoI)
MoI 5 MoI 6 MoI 7 MoI 8
Getting to LEAD: support for jurisdictions interested in replicating Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion Collaborative Outcomes Learning Tool for Prevent – a multi-agency approach to understanding and responding to extremism in Scotland LEPH2016 Film – Film festival
Law enforcement-mental health collaborations to respond to children and families exposed to violence: the CDCP Program
LOCATION: White room
LOCATION: Black room
LOCATION: Room 5
LOCATION: Room 2
SUMMARY:
This session will describe how and why LEAD was adopted in Seattle; how it might be applicable in other jurisdictions; and how the LEAD Support Bureau can assist in replication. Tools that will be discussed include evaluation, core principles, community engagement and police training.
SUMMARY:
This session will discuss the development of, and showcase an interactive, flexible multi-agency learning resource funded by the Scottish Preventing Violent Extremism Unit, part of the Scottish Government. Developed by Robert Gordon University with a range of partners, the resource not only supports learners recognise potential vulnerabilities to radicalisation but to better understand their role in safeguarding the individual from harm. The resource introduces five fictitious cases from a range of ideologies each centred on a main character. Key surrounding fictional individuals share insight into each main character, expressing their perspectives on identified behaviours. Learning is supported by facilitated discussions, knowledge checks and real life best practice responses by sector specific professionals. Key experts also provide insight into contemporary issues relating to Prevent to support additional learning in this area.
SUMMARY: SUMMARY:
Internationally, police may have been agents of marginalization but establishing relationships with communities in which they work is the best way for officers to begin and most effectively sustain the process of protecting and serving their communities. In 1991, the Yale Child Study Center developed the groundbreaking Child Development-Community Policing (CD-CP) Program in partnership with the New Haven Police Department. In CD-CP communities, police officers play a central part in the intervention, capitalizing on their roles as representatives of control and authority in the face of violent and traumatic events. Mental health professionals are on call 24/7, to respond immediately to police calls involving child victims or witnesses to violence. Working together, police and mental professionals coordinate multi-system interventions that re-establish safety, security and well-being in the immediate wake of violent events. Panellists will describe the principles and approaches of the CD-CP program, show a brief film, and engage participants in discussion about how the program applies to international communities.
FACILITATOR: Marc Krupanski,
Open Society Foundations, USA

PRESENTERS:

  1. Gabriel Sayegh,
    Katal Center for Health, Equity and Justice, USA
  2. Kris Nyrop,
    Public Defenders’ Association, LEAD National Support Director, USA
  3. Lorenzo Jones,
    Katal Center for Health, Equity and Justice, USA
  4. Lisa Daugaard,
    Public Defender Association, USA
FACILITATOR:
Audrey Gibb,
Robert Gordon University, Scotland
Films:

 

  1. Tactical anthropology,
    Michele Devlin, University of Northern Iowa, USA
    Mark Grey,
    University of Northern Iowa, USA
  2. TBC

 

PANELLISTS:

ALL SLIDES

  1. Sarah Greene,
    Program Administrator of Trauma & Justice Partnerships, Mecklenburg County Health Department, USA
  2. Eddie Levins,
    Deputy Chief (retired), Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department, USA
  3. Steven Marans,
    Director, Childhood Violent Trauma Center; Professor, Child Study Center, Yale School of Medicine, USA
16.00-17.30 S2: SPECIAL SKILLS TRAINING SESSION (Presented by the Global Law Enforcement and Public Health Research Network)

LOCATION: Room 10

FACILITATOR: Scott Burris, Temple University Beasley School of Law, U.S.A.

 GLEPH RN logo Better policy mapping through science
This Skills Training Session pitches the idea that a practice of “policy surveillance” to help end the anomalous treatment of law in policy research and practice. Policy surveillance is the systematic, scientific collection and analysis of laws of public health significance. It is accomplished through the scientific collection and coding of important laws and policies, and supported by the availability of affordable yet sophisticated web-based solutions for data creation and publication. Come and see examples of policy surveillance products (including a drug policy resource developed for the US National Institutes of Health) and test-drive the cutting-edge software for tracking the policies that matter to you.
To see the tool in action, visit www.PDAPS.org or www.LawAtlas.org
To explore the research software, visit www.MonQcle.com
19.00-21.00 EXCURSIONS (site visits)

Day 3: Tuesday 4 October

DAILY THEMES: Alcohol, Vulnerability, Leadership
09.00-17.00 POSTERS
  1. Prevention of non-communicable diseases in Argentinean Federal Police
    Juan Cruz Escardo,
    Ministry of National Security, Argentina
  2. HIV prevention policy and promotion of sexual and reproductive health for security forces officers in Argentina
    Juan Cruz Escardo,
    Ministry of National Security, Argentina
  3. Violent offenders as a target population for public health mental health care
    Thijs Fassaert,
    Public Health Service, Amsterdam
  4. A partnership approach to providing on-site HIV services for probationers and parolees: a pilot study from Alabama, USA
    Bronwen Lichtenstein, University of Alabama, USA
  5. No health without justice, no justice without health: building local health and justice partnerships
    Sunita Sturup-Toft,
    Public Health England
  6. Police referral to community services in Queensland, Australia
    Liz Greenbank, Infoxchange, Australia
  7. Southern Metropolitan Alcohol Diversion Pilot Program
    Annie Trainor, Australian Community Service Organisation
  8. Hospital referrals of detainees during police custody in Amsterdam, The Netherlands
    Tina Dorn, Public Health Service Amsterdam
09.00-10.30

PLENARY 2: Alcohol, Vulnerability, Leadership

LOCATION: Red Hall

CHAIR: Pat O’Hare, Visiting Professor in Drug Use and Addiction, John Moores University, England & at the University of Rosario, Argentina

10.30-11.00 Morning tea
11.00-12.30 MAJOR SESSIONS
M4 M5 ENALEM6 – ENALE 1: European Network on Alcohol Law Enforcement special session
Leadership on the intersections of law enforcement and public health Optimising police-academic collaborative research on public health and protection: A Scottish Model Combating drunkenness and over-serving
LOCATION: Red Hall
LOCATION: Room 6/7
LOCATION: Blue Hall
CO-CHAIRS: Auke van Dijk, Agora think Tank and Dutch Police Service &
Jenny Fleming, Criminology, University of Southampton, England
CO-CHAIRS: Nick Fyfe
Scottish Institute for Policing Research, University of Dundee, Scotland &
Malcolm Graham
Assistant Chief Commissioner, Police Scotland
CHAIR: Joost Mulder
Trimbos Institute, The Netherlands
PRESENTERS:

  1. Auke van Dijk
    Agora Thinktank, Dutch Police Service (Amsterdam)
    What matters in policing? Change, values and leadership in turbulent times
  2. Jenny Fleming
    Criminology, University of Southampton, England
    Selling Research to Police Leaders
  3. Virginie Gautron
    University of Nantes, France
    Punish and treat: an empirical study of the relationship between health care and criminal justice professionals in France
PRESENTERS:

  1. Nick Fyfe
    Scottish Institute for Policing Research, University of Dundee, Scotland
    From co-producing to connecting evidence: the SIPR model of police-academic collaboration
  2. David Alexander
    Police (Special Operations) Research Group, Aberdeen Centre for Trauma Research, Scotland
    The Police (Special Operation) Research Group – Police research: ‘with’ not ‘on’
  3. Sam McCluskey
    Domestic Abuse, Licensing and Violence Reduction Division, Police Scotland
    Policing perpetrators: developing a Scottish, evidence-based approach
  4. Midj Falconer
    Robert Gordon University, Scotland
    An exploration of well-being, resilience and vulnerability factors in Scottish police officers

    and outcomes in response to ‘trauma’ exposure
  5. Inga Heyman
    Robert Gordon University, Scotland
    Insider-outsider collaborative health and police research: challenges and facilitators
  6. Andrew Brown
    Scottish Institute for Policing Research, University of Dundee, Scotland
    Tulliallan to Texas and the journey from practitioner to expert
PRESENTERS:

  1. Patrick Widdell
    Superintendent, Swedish Police, Stockholm
    The need for police-health partnerships in dealing with alcohol harms: the police role in alcohol regulation
  2. Zara Quigg,
    Centre for Public Health, Liverpool John Moores University, England,
    Drink Less. Enjoy More: a multi-component approach in Liverpool
  3. Lotte Voorham,
    STAD Project, Trimbos Institute, The Netherlands
    The implementation of the Swedish STAD model in 7 other European countries and settings
12.30-13.30 Lunch
12.45-13.15 S3: SPECIAL LUNCHTIME LECTURE
(Hosted by the Global Law Enforcement and Public Health Research Network)
 GLEPH RN logo LOCATION: Blue Hall
CHAIR: Jenny Fleming, Criminology, University of Southampton, England
SPEAKER: Auke van Dijk
, Agora Thinktank, Dutch Police Service (Amsterdam)
Policing vulnerable people – towards a framework for analysis
13.30-15.00 CONCURRENT SESSIONS (C) and MARKETPLACE OF IDEAS (MoI)
C9 C10 C11 C12
Refugees and LEPH – what’s the relevance? Vulnerability (Proffered papers) The practice of law enforcement and public health in Amsterdam neighbourhoods The role of prisons in public health
LOCATION: Red Hall
LOCATION: Room 6/7
LOCATION: Room 10
LOCATION: Room 8/9
CO-CHAIRS: Joachim Kersten,
Criminology, Munster Police University (ret), Germany &
Steve James,
Criminology, University of Melbourne (ret), Australia
CHAIR: Xavier Moonen,
Koraal Groep Sittart, Zuyd University, University of Amsterdam
CHAIRS: Thijs Fassaert,
Public Health Service, Amsterdam &
Ronald van Steden,
VU University, Amsterdam
CHAIR: Stuart Kinner,
Griffith University, Australia

PRESENTERS:

  1. Joachim Kersten,
    Munster Police University, Germany
    The refugee crisis in the EU: an overview of the German situation with an emphasis on health, criminality, and attitudes of the German population
  2. Àgnes Lux,
    UNICEF (United Nations Children’s Emergency Fund)
    The situation of children from an UNICEF perspective
  3. Michele Devlin and Mark Grey,
    University of Northern Iowa, USA
    Homeland security, public health and refugee community relations: a case study of an Ebola prevention program for West African immigrants in Iowa.
  4. Jonas Hansson,
    UMEA University, Sweden
    Police officers’ coping strategies and general mental health in relation to unaccompanied, asylum-seeking refugee children’s forced repatriation.
PRESENTERS:

  1. Ain Peil,
    Ministry of the Interior, Estonia
    SPIN – using a sports-based intervention program, targeted at at-risk young people with lesser opportunities to break down barriers with police
  2. Nazirah Hassan,
    University of Strathclyde, Scotland
    The vulnerable among the vulnerable: exploring the dynamic experiences of victimization in juvenile justice institutions
  3. Frank Berens,
    Ministerie van Volksgezondheid, Weizijn en Sport, The Netherlands
    A comprehensive approach for persons showing confused behaviour
  4. Dinara Bakirova,
    Shah-Aiym Network, Kyrgyzstan
    Human rights violations and violence by police in Kyrgyzstan: sex worker’s perspective
  5. Denise Martin,
    University of the West of Scotland
    Craft versus Science: the importance of experience in protecting vulnerable populations
  6. Merel Schutten,
    GGD ZHZ Dordrecht, The Netherlands
    What to do with confused persons? An evaluation of team induction and interfering care
PRESENTERS:

  1. Tako Engelfriet,
    Amsterdam Municipality, The Netherlands
    Local ‘hotlines’ for citizens who seek to report concerns and nuisance relating to their residential areas
  2. Matty de Wit,
    Public Health Service, Amsterdam
    Three profiles of pathways through care of SMI (Serious mental illness) clients with multiple public crisis interventions
  3. Michael Willemsen & Frans van Gelderen,
    Public Health Service, Amsterdam
    Insight into the practice of multi-agency working on serious mental illness (SMI) across community police officers and community psychiatric nurses in Amsterdam neighborhoods
  4. Ronald van Steden,
    VU University, Amsterdam &
    Lis Weimar,
    Dutch Police, Amsterdam
    A ‘joined up’ approach toward people with Serious Mental Illnesses (SMI)
PRESENTERS:

  1. Ernest Drucker,
    John Jay College, USA
    Preventing overdose deaths after prison re-entry: a life saving role for law enforcement
  2. Anja Dirkzwager,
    Netherlands Institute for the Study of Crime and Law Enforcement
    Imprisonment and post-prison mental health: a public health challenge
  3. Matthew Maycock,
    MRC/CSO Social and Public Health Sciences Unit, University of Glasgow, Scotland
    Reflections on developing a public health intervention for prisoners in Scotland; exploring opportunities, challenges and unintended consequences of public health within prisons
  4. Dominique de Andrade,
    Griffith University, Australia
    International drug policy: implications for modern corrections and public health
ENALE 2: ENALE

European Network on Alcohol Law Enforcement special session

Alcohol law enforcement: the Dutch way
LOCATION: Blue Hall
CHAIR:
  1.  Wim van Dalen, Director STAP (Dutch Institute on Alcohol Policy) and Jeroen de Greeff, Coordinator, Dutch Expertise Centre on Alcohol Law Enforcement
    The alcohol law enforcement system in the Netherlands
  2.  Michiel van Baardewijk, Chair, Alcohol Law Enforcement Association
    Current challenges and new developments after two years of decentralisation of alcohol law enforcement in the Netherlands
  3.  Bas Zegers, Paediatrician, Eindhoven Hospital
    What Dutch hospitals are facing currently regarding young people and drunkenness/intoxications
  4. Caroline van Ferneij and Martjn Jansen, Dutch Police Service, Amersfoort
    The use of a helmet camera by the police to film and give feedback to intoxicated offenders in nightlife.
13.30-15.00
MoI 9 MoI 10 MoI 11 MoI 12
Implementing the Police, Ambulance and Clinical Early Response (PACER) team in Geelong: a regional example of police-mental health partnership How can the introduction of new evaluation criteria of operational police performance help protect the rights of vulnerable communities? Game of Life: balancing health and safety Safe environments within police services: no safety outside without safety ‘inside’
LOCATION: Room 2
LOCATION: Room 5
LOCATION: Black room
LOCATION: White room
SUMMARY:
Aiming to contribute to best practice in developing police and mental health co-response teams, this presentation offers an overview of the implementation and operation of the Police, Ambulance and Clinical Early Response (PACER) model in the regional city of Geelong, Victoria (Australia). It also provides a valuable opportunity for knowledge exchange on building success and addressing potential challenges to this type of collaboration.
SUMMARY:
This session will outline Kyrgyzstan’s Ministry of Interior’s and public health organizations’ joint development of new evaluation criteria for the operational police’s performance in order to protect rights of vulnerable communities. After describing the achievements and challenges of the initiative, a facilitated discussion will encourage a knowledge exchange through sharing of best practices, mechanisms and initiatives, and practical experience so as to foster an effective partnership between operational police and public health organizations, focusing on protection of rights of vulnerable communities in particular, and practical approaches that are relevant for operational police.
SUMMARY:
Positive Health focuses on how people function in everyday life, with possible illnesses or defects. Positive Health describes six dimensions: body function/mental wellbeing/spiritual – existential dimension/quality of life/social and community participation/daily functioning. Positive Health endorses the need for comprehensive approaches, which also fits seamlessly with changes in the social domain. We connect these six dimensions with community policing, citizen participation and self-reliance. We play a game for 4-6 players and 30 other players in the audience. With this game we connect health with safety issues and other contextual influences.
To conclude, we will have a group discussion about choices, priorities and limited resources for different vulnerable people in society.
SUMMARY:
Creating a safe organizational climate results in a better understanding and performance of law enforcement in protecting and serving the community/ marginalized communities and a more trustworthy institute as part of a democratic society. This session by the Dutch Police includes a presentation and debate on the necessity of a safe internal working climate in law enforcement as a precondition for adequately dealing with vulnerable communities. We will give a short presentation about our point of view and facilitate the discussion/ debate with examples of dilemmas.
FACILITATOR/ PRESENTER:

Jessica Saligari,
Deakin University, Australia

PPT Presentation

FACILITATOR/ PRESENTER:

Gulsara Alieva,
Kyrgyz Women Police Organisation, Kyrgyzstan & LEAHN

PPT Presentation

FACILITATORS:

  1. Caroline Dijkstra,
    Dutch Police Service (Amsterdam)
  2. Francisca Flinterman,
    Public Health Service Amsterdam, Netherlands
  3. Henneke Berkhout,
    Public Health Service Kennemerland, Haarlem, Netherlands
FACILITATORS/ PRESENTERS:

PPT Presentation

  1. A.W. (Pim) Jansonius,
    Assistant Commissioner, Dutch Police Service (Amsterdam)
  2. Annerieke Hoorn,
    Superintendent, Central Infrastructure Service, Dutch Police Service
15.00-15.30 Afternoon tea
15.30-17.00 CONCURRENT SESSIONS (C) and MARKETPLACE OF IDEAS (MoI)
C13 C14 C15 C16
Social disruption – the (mini) crisis approach: the connection between public health and safety

(This session is 2 hours in length finishing at 17.30)

Illicit drugs:
(Proffered papers)
Amsterdam vice case: inter-agency response to a major child abuse case
Prisons (Proffered papers)

(Note. This is a 2 hour session: 15.30 – 17.30)

CATION: Room 6/7
LOCATION: Room 10
LOCATION: Red Hall
LOCATION: Room 8/9
CHAIR: Paul van der Velpen,
Public Health Service, Amsterdam
CHAIR: Monique Marks,
Durban University of Technology, South Africa
CHAIR:
Maurice Punch,
Visiting Professor, London School of Economics and Politics, England
CHAIR: Stuart Kinner,
Griffith University, Australia
PRESENTERS:

  1. Sjaak de Gouw,
    Public Health Service, Holland Midden, The Netherlands
    Social and public health impact of a shooting incident: integrated aftercare
  2. Annemieke van der Zijden,
    DPG Brabant West, The Netherlands
    Out of the picture? Vulnerable people in forgotten places
  3. Moniek Pieters,
    Public Health Service, Nijmegen, The Netherlands &
    Marcel Hoff,
    GGD Gelderland-Zuid, The Netherlands
    Asylum seekers in emergency shelter: how social impact, public health and security are related
PRESENTERS:

  1. Adam Frost,
    Queensland Police Service, Australia
    Police and health – a joint approach to community awareness on crystal methamphetamine (Ice)
  2. Jaime Arrendondo,
    UC San Diego, USA
    Police Education Program to improve the implementation of drug policy reform in Mexico: initial results from a longitudinal assessment
  3. Yohan Misero
    LBH Masyarakat, Indonesia,
    Indonesia’s Compulsory Reporting: the broken bridge between law and health care
  4. Christian Schneider,
    Federal Office of Police, Switzerland
    What shapes police-public health relationships? Exploring determinants of quality of co-operation between police and addiction services in the implementation of drug policy in Switzerland
PANELLISTS:

  1. Marjolein Smit,
    District Commander, Dutch Police Service, Amsterdam
    Leading the police response to a major criminal case, inter-agency cooperation and relationship with victims’ parents
  2. Wilco Tuinebreijer,
    Psychiatrist, First Medical Professional of Public Health Service, Amsterdam
    Public health response to all those affected – victims, families and professionals – by an extreme case of very young child abuse
  3. Henk de Jong,
    Former City Council Secretary, Amsterdam: now Dutch Police Service, Programme Director Strategy
    Mayoral response to a major case of abuse of young children raising wide public concern
PRESENTERS:

  1. Nasrul Ismail,
    University of the West of England
    Should we use legal regulations to influence healthy prison agendas in England?
  2. Julia Morgan,
    Plymouth University, England
    Improving prison visiting experiences for imprisoned parents and their children
  3. Caroline Leeson,
    Plymouth University, England
    A hidden population of young carers
  4. Annet Slijkhuis,
    Correctional Offices of The Netherlands
    The Correctional Offices in the Netherlands: a finding and guiding place for the incapacitated and socially disadvantaged person
  5. Dominique de Andrade,
    Griffith University, Australia
    Escalating chaotic lifestyle among ex-prisoners: exploring the relationship between emergency health service utilisation and return to custody
  6. Eamonn O’Moore,
    Public Health England
    Improving international collaborative research on health in prison and other justice settings: introducing the WHO Europe Prison Health Reseach and Engagement Network (WEPHREN)
ENALE 3: ENALE
European Network on Alcohol Law Enforcement special session
Police and Night-time Economies

LOCATION: Blue Hall

CHAIR:
PRESENTER:

  1. Ellen Leslie, University of Queensland, Australia
    Consequences of concurrent and simultaneous stimulant and alcohol use among young adults: hazardous drinking, antisocial behaviour, and contact with police
  2. Patrick Widell, Superintendent, Swedish Police, Stockholm
    Training of Norwegian police in better alcohol law enforcement
  3. Elske Hamerlink, Amsterdam Municipality & Ella Overkleeft, Project Manager, N8BM, Amsterdam
    Squares Project: safer night time economies in collaboration with traders (TBC)
15.30-17.00
MoI 13 MoI 14 MoI 15 MoI 16
Collaboration in threat management between police and mental health care workers Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion (LEAD): changing police practices Tackling the harm of binge drinking – a Police Scotland, Community Partnership and Robert Gordon University student approach Law enforcement and harm reduction: informing, advancing, assisting
LOCATION: White room
LOCATION: Black room
LOCATION: Room 5
LOCATION: Room 2
SUMMARY:
The aim of the workshop is to increase knowledge on how to prevent further impairment of functioning in high risk individuals and thereby avoid danger of aggression aimed at others. In the past few years a method has been developed that focusses on a) risk assessment, b) a person-centered approach, c) cooperation between stakeholders.
The method will be explained in detail, including the instruments used for risk assessment. Participants of the workshop will be invited to contribute case histories to facilitate a discussion on how to deal with information and privacy, in the collaboration with different stakeholders like police, mental health care or community services. Attention will be paid to possible conflicts of interest that may arise when sharing information.
SUMMARY:
The Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion (LEAD) program is a community-based diversion approach for people who commit law violations due to behavioral health issues, with the goals of improving public safety and public order and reducing illegal behavior. This session will focus on why law enforcement agencies may be motivated to adopt LEAD and how to engage rank and file officers in doing so. The session will also explore the benefits of cross-system cooperative efforts between law enforcement and public health/social work practitioners. Particular attention will be paid to how front line officers were engaged in adopting and implementing LEAD, police training, and the practical details of how to replicate this approach.
SUMMARY:
This session will share insights into the collaborative development of alcohol safety messages over the Christmas period through a partnership approach comprising Police Scotland, Robert Gordon University (RGU) students and the Weekend Partnership, a group of 70 partner agencies based in Aberdeen, Scotland involved in promoting the safety and diversity of the city’s night time economy.A series of short videos developed by the RGU students will be shown. They highlight common alcohol-related safety issues reported to emergency services and support agencies involving those venturing out over the festive period. The importance of such a partnership approach and the impetus for development from a community perspective will be discussed. The focus, co-development and subsequent management of the six videos will be shared. After viewing the videos participants can discuss with presenters the lessons learned, plans for future collaborations and opportunities to develop such resources in their own areas.
SUMMARY:
We have produced many these resources designed to provide objective information and rational guidance regarding police and harm reduction. The information is presented by law enforcement, for law enforcement, which has accounted for broader acceptance to the information than if it were presented by a non-police organization. The resources and productions which will be highlighted aim to relate the various laws, regulations and public policy to the street level. Additionally, a policy template will be discussed which uses best practices and experiences to provide policy guidance to law enforcement agencies to successfully integrate with local harm reduction operations.
FACILITATOR/ PRESENTER:

  1. Didier Rammers,
    Dutch Police Service (Driebergen)
  2. Marcel Tiehuis,
    Dutch Police Service (Driebergen)
FACILITATOR:

Marc Krupanski,
Open Society Foundations, USA

PRESENTERS:

  1. Chief Deputy Jim Pugel,
    King County Sheriff’s Office, USA
  2. Chief Brendan Cox,
    Albany Police Department, USA
  3. Deanna Nollette,
    Seattle Police Department, USA
  4. Keith Brown,
    Katal Center for Health, Equity and Justice, USA
  5. Melody Lee,
    Katal Center for Health, Equity and Justice, USA

 

FACILITATORS/ PRESENTERS:

  1. Corina Andrian,
    Robert Gordon University, Aberdeen, Scotland
  2. Adam Johnston,
    Robert Gordon University, Aberdeen, Scotland
PRESENTER:

Mark Spawn,
The Spawn Group, USA

17.00-18.00 AN INFORMAL NETWORKING OPPORTUNITY
Refreshments for all LEPH2016 participants (at conference venue)
19.00-21.00 EXCURSIONS (site visits)

Day 4: Wednesday 5 October

DAILY THEMES: Infectious diseases/harm reduction, Trauma
09.00-10.30

PLENARY 3: Harm reduction and trauma


LOCATION: Red Hall


CHAIR: Monique Marks,
Durban University of Technology, South Africa

  • Pat O’Hare
    Visiting Professor in Drug Use and Addiction, John Moores University, England & at the University of Rosario, Argentina
    Shifting the emphasis from public order to public health
  • Marcia Neave AO
    former Chair of the Royal Commission into Family Violence, Victoria, Australia
    Some public health dilemmas: lessons from the Royal Commission into Family Violence
  • Peter van der Velden
    Professor, Law Faculty, Tilburg University, The Netherlands
    Stress and PTSD among police officers: risks, myths and prevention
10.30-11.00 Morning tea
11.00-12.30 MAJOR SESSIONS
M7 M8 M9
The phenomenon of trauma: challenges and rewards of law enforcement – mental health partnerships HIV and harm reduction Developing effective police responses to reduce the public health burden of intimate partner and family violence
LOCATION: Red Hall
LOCATION: Room 6/7
LOCATION: Blue Hall
CHAIR: Tina Dorn,
Public Health Service, Amsterdam

SUMMARY:
Traumatic dysregulation which follows confrontation with the worst of human nightmares has enormous short and longer-term impacts on both immediate victims and witnesses of violence. There is also a tremendous potential impact on responding professionals – both police officers and mental health professionals – that that can interfere with recognizing and attending to the impact on immediate victims. Responding professionals may need to ignore the full extent and impact of catastrophic events if there is nothing practical they can offer to those affected; they may be left feeling helpless and ineffectual. This presentation will:

  • Outline basic phenomenon associated with acute traumatic response, peritraumatic and longer-term impact of violence and other overwhelming events
  • Use personal vignettes from both police and mental health professionals both before and after joining forces in what would become shared efforts to respond more effectively to those impacted by the horrors of traumatic violence and catastrophe
  • Demonstrate ways in which steps involved in the building of collaborative work can address and help to overcome the barriers of isolation and lead to greater experience of professional effectiveness, no longer necessitating turning a blind eye to pain and suffering associated with brutality, violence and destruction
CHAIR: Melissa Jardine
Centre for Law Enforcement and Public Health, Australia
CHAIR: Troy McEwan
Swinburne University and Forensicare, Australia
PRESENTER:
Steven Marans,
Director, Childhood Violent Trauma Center; Professor, Child Study Center,
Yale School of Medicine, USADISCUSSANTS:

  1. Sarah Greene,
    Charlotte Child Development-Community Policing (CD-CP)
  2. Eddie Levins,
    Deputy Chief (ret), Charlotte-Mecklenberg Police Department Police
PRESENTERS:

  1. Ernest Drucker
    John Jay College, USA
    Local Police role in Naloxone distribution and overdose rescue: a bridge to building Law Enforcement’s role and support for harm reduction
  2. Jones Blantari
    Ghana Police Service
    Rights protection and programming for key populations in Ghana: the role of the Ghana Police Service conducting the Integrated Bio-behavioural Surveillance Survey
  3. Annette Verster
    World Health Organization, Switzerland
    Key populations, HIV and law enforcement
  4. Lars Küthe,
    Drug Commissioner, Police HQ, Frankfurt, Germany
    “Frankfurter Weg”: an opportunity for all
PRESENTERS:

  1. Vanda Fortunato
    Macedon Ranges and North West Melbourne Medicare Local, Australia
    Why a health organisation became interested in policing of family violence
  2. Joakim Petersson
    Mid Sweden University, Sweden &
    Heidi Selnius
    Orebo University, Sweden
    Implementing effective police risk assessment and management for family violence
  3. Stuart Bateson
    Victoria Police, Australia &
    Troy McEwan
    Swinburne University and Forensicare, Australia
    How a partnership between police and forensic mental health services can change outcomes for victims of family violence
12.30-13.30 Lunch
12.45-13.15 S4: SPECIAL LUNCHTIME LECTURE
 GLEPH RN logo Police dealing with mental health issues in low income settings

LOCATION: Blue Hall

CHAIR and COMMENTATOR: Michael Brown OBE, College of Policing National Coordinator for Mental Health, UK

PRESENTER: Julius Yankson, SuperintendentGhana Police Service

13.30-15.00 CONCURRENT SESSIONS (C) and MARKETPLACE OF IDEAS (MoI)
C17 C18 C19 C20
Harm reduction and police 1: problems and challenges
(Proffered papers)
Violence
(Proffered papers)
Drug consumption rooms as a win-win tool for public order and for the health of people who use drugs The Amsterdam approach on extreme intimidation and harassment in the home environment
LOCATION: Room 6/7
LOCATION: Blue Hall
LOCATION: Room 8/9 LOCATION: Red Hall
CHAIR: Scott Burris,
Temple University Beasley School of Law, U.S.A.
CHAIR: Inga Heyman,
Robert Gordon University, Scotland
CHAIRS: Eberhard Schatz,
Correlation, The Netherlands &
Mark Spawn
,
The Spawn Group, USASUMMARY:
The session will highlight collaboration between drug consumption rooms and police in local settings, address benefits and shortcomings and discuss strategies to engage with policy makers, public and police for the establishment of such facilities.
CHAIR: Ronald van Steden,
VU University, Amsterdam
PRESENTERS:

  1. Wamala Twaibu,
    Harm Reduction Network, Uganda
    Human rights violations against people who use drugs in Uganda: the need to engage PWUDs in the fight against HIV
  2. Dinara Bakirova,
    Shah-Aiym Network, Kyrgyzstan
    Arbitrary detentions and police raids as an obstacle in implementing HIV prevention programs with sex workers
  3. Javier Cepeda,
    Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, USA
    (To be presented by Leo Beletsky)
    Occupational hazards of drug law enforcement: needlestick injury and its correlates among police officers in Baltimore, Maryland
  4. Konstantinos Farmakidis-Markou,
    Centre for Life, Greece
    Criminalization of HIV-transmission in police operations of 2012: human rights violations and public health concerns
PRESENTERS:

  1. Marc Delsing,
    Praktikon, Nijmegen, The Netherlands
    Violence prevention through early risk assessment: development and validation of the Prokid risk assessment tool
  2. Jacki Tapley,
    University of Portsmouth, England
    Arrest and restore: adopting a reformative approach as a path to prevention in cases of domestic abuse
  3. Tina Dorn,
    Public Health Service Amsterdam
    Characteristics of victims of sexual assault seen by Amsterdam forensic nurses, January 2012 to May 2013
  4. Jocelyn Anderson,
    West Mercia Rape and Sexual Abuse Support Centre, England
    Sexual violence: reactive and proactive prevention
PRESENTERS:
(Presenters from various settings)

  1. Conrad Kockert,
    Coordinator DCR De Regenboog Groep, Amsterdam
  2. Gabi Becker,
    Integrative Drogenhilfe, Frankfurt, Germany
  3. Marianne Jauncey,
    Uniting Medically Supervised Injecting Centre, Australia
  4. Lars Küthe,
    Drug Commissioner, Police HQ, Frankfurt, Germany
    Cooperation between drug services and police – using the example of drug consumption rooms

 

PRESENTERS:

  1. Mireille Geldorp,
    Amsterdam Municipality, Public Order and Safety, The Netherlands,
    A person-oriented approach on extreme intimidation and harassment in home environments
  2. Ardan Miedema,
    Public Health Service, Amsterdam,
    Public Health Profiling: profiles of extreme harassers
  3. Jan Pronker, Dutch Police Service (Amsterdam),
    Putting profiles into practice: merits and limitations of public health profiles from the police perspective
  4. Michael Willemsen, Public Health Service Amsterdam
    Golden rules for dealing with the victims of extreme intimidation and harassment in home environments
13.30-15.00
MoI 17 MoI 18 MoI 19 MoI 20
Trauma-focused police responses to children exposed to violence: a national plan for the United States Family group conference
Cooperation works! Sexual Assault Center Amsterdam-Amstelland: accessible and essential care for all recent victims of sexual assault Think Tank: How do we best achieve a joined-up police and mental health response to mental health crisis?
LOCATION: White room
LOCATION: Room 5
LOCATION: Black Room
LOCATION: Room 2
SUMMARY:
In the United States, childhood exposure to violence (CEV) is a problem that has reached epidemic proportions, affecting over 60% of children each year. The long-term negative impact of childhood exposure to violence has been well documented and includes physiological hyperarousal, structural brain abnormalities, and cognitive deficits, as well as increased rates of mental health disorders and risk-taking behaviors, including substance abuse and suicide attempts (Beers & De Bellis, 2002; De Bellis et al., 1999; Perry, 2002, Teicher, 2000). In 2012, the United States Attorney General’s Defending Childhood Task Force recommended enhancing the collaboration between law enforcement and mental health service providers to ensure that all children exposed to violence are routinely identified, screened and assessed (Listenbee et al., 2012). The US Department of Justice has been working in collaboration with the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) and the Childhood Violent Trauma Center at the Yale Child Study Center (Yale), to create a toolkit designed to enhance law enforcement’s capacity to respond to CEV. Panellists will describe the tools and resources, as well as the results of a comprehensive national training initiative.
SUMMARY:
The family group conference movement has disseminated from New Zealand all over the world. Its main principles are “Let people decide themselves” and “Enlarge the family circle”. In The Netherlands over 10.000 family group conferences (FGC) have taken place. When children are about to fall under court-custody, parents can make a detailed plan together with family members, friends and people from their neighbourhood so children can stay with their family. In The Netherlands the model of the family group conference is applied to other social themes like mental health problems, disabled persons, aged people in isolation, financial and housing problems. The FGC can also be applied to nuisance in the neighbourhood and as restorative justice. All FGCs are systematically evaluated by the participants. This session will provide general information about the family group conference, examples of its application, and discussion about the possible role of local police officers.
SUMMARY:
Since 2012, the Police and Public Health Service, Amsterdam have been working together intensively to provide victims of sexual abuse or assault with timely and essential care, and the opportunity to optimize their chances of success in the criminal justice system. This cooperation was expanded in January 2016 with multiple partners and housed in the new Sexual Assault Center (Centrum Seksueel Geweld, CSG). We will present the method of the Center and how the cooperation expanded to include more partners. Using case studies we will explore what makes the cooperation stronger or weaker. All participants are explicitly invited to provide their own solutions and suggestions for further development.
PROBLEM STATEMENT:
How can we, when a crisis situation occurs, come to a good joined (mental health care and police) and rapid response that preferably takes place on the spot or at least makes sure that mental health care professionals are involved as soon as possible? Options include:

  • Minimizing police involvement to a role in which police only is responsible for safety
  • Maximizing client involvement (and involvement client’s network)
  • Mental Health Care professionals on the spot (preferably at patients home)
  • No unnecessary intermediaries, client needs the appropriate care immediately
  • Ability to function in rural areas (in terms of response time, cost effectiveness, etc)
FACILITATOR: Hilary Hahn,
Yale Childhood Violent Trauma Center, USA
FACILITATOR and CO-PRESENTER: Gerard van der Zalm,
Dutch Police Service (Rotterdam)
FACILITATOR: Vera Schuller,
Public Health Service Amsterdam
CHAIR: Jeroen Traas,
Manager of acute mental health services at Dimence, a Dutch mental health organisation.
PRESENTERS and PANELLISTS:

  1. Hilary Hahn,
    Yale Childhood Violent Trauma Center, USA
  2. Kelly Burke,
    International Association of Chiefs of Police, USA
  3. Naama de la Fontaine,
    Yale Childhood Violent Trauma Centre, USA
 CO-PRESENTER:

Joost Witlox,
Eigen Kracht Centrale, The Netherlands

 

PRESENTERS:

  1. Jan de Jong,
    Vice Squad, Dutch Police Service, Amsterdam
  2. Marijke Eppink,
    Public Health Service, Amsterdam
  3. Benne Holwerda,
    Public Organization against Domestic Violence and Child Abuse, GGD Amsterdam
  4. Vera Schuller,
    Sexual Assault Center Amsterdam-Amstelland, Netherlands
PRESENTERS:

  1. Jeroen Traas,
    Manager of acute mental health services at Dimence, a Dutch mental health organisation.
    Introduction to the subject
  2. Inge Boele,
    Ingetikt, The Netherlands & Experience expert
    Her experiences in crisis situations and the importance of good cooperation between several organizations.
  3. Drs. Elnathan Prinsen – Psychiatrist and manager of the division acute mental health services at Dimence
    From a mental health perspective: the way mental healthcare in acute situations is organised now and what opportunities and difficulties occur in co-working with police
  4. Paul Jennings, Hampshire Constabulary, England
    From a policing perspective: his experiences with leading the UK’s first ever joint Police/MH patrol vehicle (Street Triage).

Workshop:
Group work on finding possible solutions to the problem and requirements to make them work, followed by comments from the expert panel.

15.00-15.30 Afternoon tea
15.30-17.00 CONCURRENT SESSIONS (C) and MARKETPLACE OF IDEAS (MoI)
C21 C22 C23 C24
Drug courts: are they a solution or a problem? Mental health 2: Law enforcement and mental health in practice (Proffered papers) Harm reduction and police 2: approaches to solutions (Proffered papers) Trauma
(Proffered papers)
LOCATION: Room 6/7
LOCATION: Room 8/9
LOCATION: Blue Hall
LOCATION: Red Hall
MODERATOR: Jasmine Tyler,
Open Society Foundations, USA
CHAIR: Stuart Thomas,
RMIT University, Australia
CHAIR: Marc Krupanski,
Open Society Foundations, USA
CHAIR: Lillian Artz,
University of Cape Town, South Africa
DISCUSSANTS:
(Presentation titles to be advised)

  1. Daniel Abrahamson, Legal Counsel, Drug Policy Alliance, USA
  2. Andrea James, Families for Justice as Healing, USA (TBC)
  3. John Collins, London School of Economics, England
  4. Howard Josepher, LCSW, Exponents, USA
  5. Christine Mehta,
    Physicians for Human Rights, USA

 

 

PRESENTERS:

  1. Meron Wondemaghen,
    Southampton, England
    Policing the mentally ill in the South of England
  2. Inga Heyman,
    Robert Gordon University, Scotland
    A study of pathways and interface between police, those in mental health distress and emergency health services
  3. Sue-Ann MacDonald,
    University of Montreal, Canada
    Discourses and practices in a mental health court
  4. Menno Segeren,
    Public Health Service Amsterdam
    Public mental health care needs of young adult violent repeat offenders
  5. Gretchen Rohr,
    Project Officer, Open Society Foundations, USA
PRESENTERS:

  1. Cinzia Brentari,
    Harm Reduction International, England
    Scaling up harm reduction in places of detention: a public health and human rights imperative
  2. Simon Howell & Monique Marks,
    University of Cape Town, South Africa
    Harm reduction efforts in South Africa: tentative steps towards new practices
  3. Mark Spawn,
    The Spawn Group, USA
    Law enforcement and harm reduction: informing, advancing, assisting
  4. Abraham Lincoln Sammanasu Nathan,
    National AIDS Control Organization, India
    Strengthening partnership between law enforcement and public health: India
  5. Md. Masudur Rahman Bhuiyan,
    Additional Deputy Inspector General
    Bangladesh Police
    The police role in the HIV response in Bangladesh
PRESENTERS:

  1. Michael Daffern,
    Swinburne University, Australia
    The impact of inpatient violence on mental health staff
  2. Peter Unwin & Dani Stephens-Lewis,
    University of Worcester, England
    The health implications of childhood sexual exploitation on parents
  3. Kirsty McGregor,
    University of Worcester, England & Steve Sidaway,
    West Mercia Police, UK
    Victims of child sexual abuse and exploitation: revictimisation, journeys of recovery and criminal justice processes in Warwickshire and West Mercia
  4. Jones Blantari,
    Ghana Police & LEAHN
    Increasing the uptake of Post Exposure Prophylaxis by rape survivors in Ghana: the role of the Ghana Police Service
  5. Ian Hesketh,
    College of Policing, UK
    The UK Police Workplace Wellbeing Charter
15.30-17.00
17.00-17.30 PLENARY 4: LEPH2016 CONFERENCE CLOSING SESSION